Brave Enough To Try

Over many of years as an educator, I have presented to many audiences in many capacities.  I’ve presented to students from Kindergarten to secondary, students at the university level, educators on staff and at professional development events, parents at PAC meetings or on school tours.  I have informed and entertained individuals to large groups.  I can throw a good party where everyone is invited.  I can fill in uncomfortable silences and make my guests feel welcome.


I was invited by Gabe Pillay to present at EDvent2017.  An event framed around the words of Cicero, “Learning is a kind of natural food for the mind”, promised an entertaining and thought provoking event.  The ideas came fast and furious.  What makes a fabulous restaurant experience?  What makes an optimal learning experience?

I had 5 minutes to quickly enlighten and inspire my audience.  The challenge from my friend and SFU colleague, Linda Klassen, was to try the Ignite format based on the Japanese PechaKucha .  Twenty slides advancing with a timer.  She did warn me about the challenge of maintaining the timing with the slides and the talk but assured me I was up to the challenge.

I loved the thinking around the idea of a menu for meaningful learning.  On Spring Break, the ideas came together on the beach in Vietnam.  Choosing the slides was fun. The big challenge for me  was being concise.  As I’ve told many of you, when my Auntie Myrna said “What’s your story, Morning Glory?”,  I included a well developed plot with all of the details.  Words had to be cut right, left and center.  Every word that was uttered, mattered.  Of course, it didn’t help that the slides and timing were submitted long before I finished changing the script.  If only I had followed the advice frequently given to my students to leave lots of time to practice.  I stopped scripting talks long ago because I thought it made me sound stilted when I talked.  In this format, I needed to relearn the art.  Scripting was imperative to maintain the timing. My Grandmother singing Rambling Rose was in the forefront of my mind.  I needed to focus.  To be specific yet still…inspiring…entertaining.

With every risk comes the chance of failure.  When self doubt triggers, it multiplies exponentially.  I am a big picture thinker with imagination which in cases like this does not help.  I am on the slate of presenters who I respect. I step up to the podium with a real sense of regret I hadn’t finalized in enough time to memorize the talk.  Why am I doing this again?  I scan the room and consider the worst case scenario.  Yes, I was that nervous.

In 5 minutes, it is all over and I am free to truly enjoy the rest of the event complete with inspiring speakers, yummy appies, hilarious Iron-EDU-Chef challenges and the infamous Candy Bar.  This risk taking endeavor has perhaps not been as inspirational as I had hoped for but has allowed for a connection with the audience and an experience to reflect on.

As school leaders we welcome, encourage and prompt our staff to take the risk to try something new on a regular basis.  The new curriculum in B.C. commands not only new ways of approaching established curriculum  but new ways of thinking.  Yet, it is easy to forget the range of emotions engaged by the process of taking risks.   It is an act of courage to try something different.  It is an act of bravery to do it repetitively.  Every now and then I think we all need to try something that scares us enough to remember the extent of that bravery!  Kudos to our teachers who do it everyday!

Advertisements

Fear Not! Lessons from Astronaut Chris Hadfield

  • Artwork by Lyon – Gr. 3
  • Reason2Ponder:  This featured weekly blog post is intended to consider some of the big questions and possibilities that exist in education and learning in the 21st Century

Reason2Ponder #1 – Fear Not!  Lessons from Chris Hadfield

[52] ISO: 100 Aprt: F8 Shut: 30 Lens: 31 Exps: A Prog: SP ExpC: -1.0 Metr: Cntr Fl s: Norm D md: S F md: S F ar: Wide Dist: ??

I remember as a very little girl, seeing the television screen filled with the pictures of the first moon walk.  Seemingly endless footage of not a lot happening.  Yet, for many years, Neil Armstrong was THE astronaut.  In later years, I was somewhat disappointed that he couldn’t have reference his giant step for everyone (not just man), but still he was a key player doing something that mattered.  His place was not questioned until Commander Chris Hadfield brought space into the classroom.  Here was a man that could validate the dreams of a 9 year old can come true.  He was also able to recognize the significance of engaging adults and children alike while he was in space via twitter, video, and music to communicate and inspire.

It is no wonder that educators flocked to hear him speak in Vancouver, B.C. in February at the FISA BC Conference 2016.  Although I was only able to participate via Twitter @CarrieFroese @Cmdr-Hadfield, one of the TedTalks 2014 links was particularly inspiring:  Chris Hadfield – What I learned about fear when I went blind in space.  He explores the notion of looking at the difference between perceived fear and actual danger.  One of the things that he emphasized in his talk was the amount of time spent on practicing for the possibilities that could unfold in space.  He discusses our ability to change our primal fear and come out with a set of experiences and a level of inspiration not otherwise possible. This is what allowed him to proceed calmly even when he lost sight in both eyes when he was outside of the spacecraft.  As an educator in the midst of some major changes in the way we do school, it is not difficult to identify much of the fear and trepidation moving forward with the redesigned curriculum.  However the take-away from Chris is that we have a huge amount of experience as learners and working with children and curriculum.  There is often fear in the midst of change.  However our background knowledge, broad range of experience, extensive research and our collaborative skills put us in good stead to forge the path so our students are well equipped with the ability to navigate successfully through the demands and realities of life in the 21st century.

Chris Hadfield finishes using the music and lyrics of David Bowie to inspire us to take our own self perception to a new level.  Fear not, my fellow educators.  We are ready to navigate successfully on our present course.