Exploring in the Digital Media Studio

I had the opportunity to spend the morning in the Digital Lab at Norma Rose Point School with middle school students yesterday.  There are just those days when just being in a buzzing room of completely engaged students fills my heart with an amazing sense of how much of a privilege it is to be an educator in this time and place in history.  We are part of unprecedented change and possibility in the school system.

Adrienne Wood is our Digital Media specialist.  Middle School students come to her for a three month rotation in the Digital Media Studio for 3 periods per week.  At this time they are exposed to a variety of applications on the computers / iPads and Maker Space using Raspberry Pi.  The teacher provides a link with the goals and expectations of this exploratory class. Students are required to complete ten projects in groups of three.  Each project is done with different group members to give students experience collaborating with a variety of people with a variety of approaches to the project work.

Yesterday students entered the Studio with a clear sense of what they needed to accomplish.  Students quickly broke off into groups to focus on completing their projects using:

3D design using Ignite

Raspberry Pi


Coding using Scratch or Codecademy

Ignition to learn about Digital Literacy and Responsibility

Comic Life

Stop Motion

Challenges included a broken wire on the Raspberry Pi, connectivity issues and the inability to edit existing work for the 3D designs but…  the kids had a plan of what needed to happen next.  They used a variety of strategies to problem solve, including the people in the room and online help. It was not enough to break anyone’s stride.  I think of my response when learning new technologies and the exasperation.  In some cases, students experiencing insurmountable issues shifted their attention to helping other students in the group with the realization that specific things would need to happen before they could get on with the project.  The only prompt from the teacher required was a reminder to save their work to OneDrive before the end of the class.

A room full of Grade 6 students are well on their way to establishing the skills that will be an integral part of their lives.  They will have a variety of ways to pursue their own interests and a full toolbox to pursue job opportunities.  The opportunities provided in this class have been orchestrated by a curious educator who is willing to take risks in her own learning to enable her students to engage with technology in purposeful learning.

The energy in the room is palpable.

 

 

 

Spaces to Think

In January, I was transferred to Norma Rose Point School, located beside The University of British Columbia.  My route to work now takes me along the same path I trekked along 4th Avenue with my older sister and the neighbourhood kids to Queen Mary Elementary School.  The one day that I biked to NRP, confirmed that my perception as a five year old was correct in assessing that it was a REALLY big hill to get to Queen Mary Elementary School.  The daily drive along memory lane has also precipitated reflections on my early school memories in the Kindergarten house at Queen Mary.

Mrs. Hicks “lived” in the very welcoming Kindergarten house, an outbuilding of Queen Mary Elementary School and was immune to the dominant “cells and bells” of the Ford model of design.  It had big spaces to gather, a piano with a big oval rug for singing time, a cuckoo clock to ponder the notion of time and lots of stations to build, create and experience integrated learning.  I clearly remember mastering tying on the Fisher Price big shoe with laces and being able to predict how many times the bird would say cuckoo before it hit the hour.   Outside the ocean was close by and the forest provided endless building materials for recess and lunch projects, although it may have “officially” been out of bounds.  I do remember a hole in the fence.   It was a safe and happy place to explore that had some of the comforts of home and the collaborative possibility of friends.

 

Norma Rose Point is a rebuild on the site where University Hill Secondary School use to be.  The only thing that remains from the original school is the gym, which was impressive back in the day.  The visioning process for Rose Point School was led by FNI (Fielding Nair International)  and they consulted with the design architects,  Think Space.   It has allowed for a collaborative, iterative experience and celebrates that the school is on Musqueam ancestral lands and a perfect conduit to facilitate understanding of indigenous ways of knowing.  The building itself embodies the shift in school design.  For me it has pushed the question – How does site design impact learning opportunities?

When you walk into Rose Point School, the welcoming and friendly tone of the school is evident.  While it is delightful, it is something I have experienced in several schools in the three districts I have worked in as an educator.  It directly correlates with the strength of the relationships that the caring adults in the building have developed with the students.  What is unique in the school, is  the wide open spaces, natural light and beauty and the variety of spaces and places and ways that students are engaged in learning and their willingness to talk about it.  The school mantra of “learners at the centre” is clearly understood by the students.  They understand that teachers are their to support them in their learning journey rather than to simply rank them on what they are able to memorize and regurgitate on a test.


In his book Blueprint for Tomorrow:  Redesigning Schools for Student-Centered Learning (2014), Prakash Nair shares the ethos that well-designed school buildings can be a catalyst for pedagogical change.   I suspect that when educators have embraced a child centered pedagogy which capitalizes on social learning practices and integration across disciplines, the site allows the collaborative practice and the learning to flourish.  That being said, there is no doubt that the brilliance of architectural design companies like ThinkSpace and FNI has been the willingness to identify current educational priorities and allow them to take form in amazing educational facilities. NRI has designed educational buildings in 47 countries across 6 continents, which speaks to the reach of the profound global shifts in education which are responsive to the needs of the learner.

Norma Rose Point School is in the enviable position of having both the educators and site which represent the same vision for learners.  Rosa Fazio, the principal of the school, frames the vision with the OECD’s Principles of Innovative Learning.  As you move through the building, you are able to see students working in several different configurations.  Sometimes they are in small groups or independently developing fluency in basic literacy and numeracy skills. Sometimes they are in collaborative groups developing a project concept or problem solving around an issue.  Nair outlines 20 Modalities of learning, and you can identify all of them as you move through both the K-5 and middle (6-8) school wings of the school on any given day.


As a 5 year old, I experienced an environment with comfortable and diversified spaces for taking risks in my learning.  My kindergarten teacher, Mrs. Hicks, understood the importance of creating a welcoming environment and planning for diversified opportunities, places and groupings to facilitate student learning.  Perhaps everything I needed to know I did learn in Kindergarten.  So glad this philosophy has permeated not only mainstream educational philosophy but also school design.

NOTE:  The Language of School Design:  Design Patterns for 21st Century School by Nair, Fielding and Lackney (2013) was also excellent reading to clarify current thinking around school design.

Challenging “Alternative Truths”

“Honesty is the best policy” is an adage that has been kicked to the curb openly of late.  The “alternative truth” is the actually emerging as “a thing”.   I was brought up with several “alternative truths,” but even as a young child I identified them as nothing more than lies.  I also knew that championing the truth was futile in some cases.  It was better not to ask questions.  However the question “why” didn’t disappear.  The people that I most trusted and respected were the people who told me the truth.

The ability of the “alternative truth” to survive, depends largely on the power of the person or institution serving it up as the truth, and how desperately they strive to sustain it.  However the quest for truth  is an long established practice.  The imagery of light is also used to explore the notion of truth, throughout many religions and social justice groups.  If something can bear scrutiny, we can hopefully re-emerge better – more just, more empathetic, more inclusive, more willing to identify similarities and more willing to value differences.

The study of history and political science in university taught me how to adopt a position, create an argument and then switch sides.  The facts and arguments you chose to expound or omit, allowed you to take both sides.  Yet, sometimes the facts were significant enough to define the truth or reality of that time in history.  There is no alternative truth.  Sometimes there are just fears and insecurities that allow people in power to manipulate with Machiavellian intent.  Our minds easily shift to south of the border, pre-World War II Germany or apartheid in South Africa.  Our minds don’t as easily shift to our reality as Canadians.  The Chinese Head Tax, the internment of the Japanese and treatment of our Indigenous people are all examples of that same Machiavellian policy that grew out of fears and insecurities.  Yet, if we never explore our history, we can never understand our current realities or a path to move forward based on understanding rather than ignorance.


I had an amazing week of professional learning this week thanks to Brad Baker and his team of inspired educators from the North Vancouver School District.  My friend, Latash (Maurice) Nahanee, was the first person to ever help me begin to understand the legacy of residential schools and other forms of institutionalized racism.  The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada brought the conversation into mainstream.  People such as Martin Brokenleg, DeeDee DeRose and Don Fiddler  have done an amazing job of helping us to understand why Aboriginal Education is necessary for us to understand our own history and the importance of changing our relationship with Aboriginal families.

On Wednesday night, Brad Baker presented at a PDK dinner meeting for instructional leaders.  He explored some of the ways how we can move beyond tokenism and engage in meaningful Aboriginal education for all of our students throughout the year.  This can be a basic as including an acknowledgement that we live, work and learn on Aboriginal lands.  Yes, this does mean that we need to find out who were the Aboriginal people that first lived on the lands we now inhabit.  Although I grew up in Vancouver and studied history, I learned relatively recently that I grew up on the ancestral lands of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh.

On Friday at the Professional Learning Rep Assembly for BCPVPA (British Columbia Principal and Vice Principal’s Association), I participated in the Blanket Activity for a second time.  This activity is very powerful and includes excerpts from government documents and statements from Aboriginal people.  Participants begin standing on blankets that represent Turtle Island in Ontario.  Blankets are manipulated or removed as the story unfolds, as are the people on them.

I participated in this activity for the first time as part of district professional development.  I read passages both times, that reflected Aboriginal voice.  This made both experiences very personal.  However the first time I participated, I was removed from the group relatively early when land was encroached upon and my blanket was removed.  From outside the circle, it became more of a cerebral experience.  On Friday, I was never removed from the circle.  I watched as others were lost to disease, residential schools, placed on reserves or lost status because they left the reserve.  The experience remained very personal and the feeling of waiting for “my turn” ever present.  I can’t imagine anyone participating in this activity and not empathizing with the fate of these participants in our collective history.

Brad Baker emphasizes when he speaks that goal of Aboriginal Education is not to inspire guilt but understanding.  Laura Tait’s video about The Principles of Learning is on my repeated watch list to focus my attention on looking at the world through an Indigenous lens. The inclusion on these principles in the new BC curriculum provides a meaningful way to engage students in learning that has taken place over thousands of years.  There is no “alternative truth” to what happened in our history.  Let’s participate in Jan Hare’s MOOC at UBC – Reconciliation Through Indigenous Education , keep talking and and learning, and step away from judgments and thinking that obscure a respectful path forward.  Most of all, to quote Brad Baker – “Go Forward with Courage!”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smart Resolutions Revisited

Years of writing New Years Resolutions and in 2017,  I just stopped.  Bad idea.  I never have a lack of things I want to do and learn and be.  I do have a hard time finding the time and the energy.  Years of goal setting with staff and children has given me a healthy appreciation of SMART goals. The biggest mistake is giving up on the aspiration and pursuit of “better”.

I personally have two windows of opportunity for pausing and making goals that boldly strike out in new and sometimes the same ways – New Years and summer holidays (once I’ve had some R&R time).  I missed the mark this year. I was just going to strive for balance.  Hasn’t worked.  It has resulted in complacency.

My answer is New Years Resolutions – one month late.  I am going back to creating with my smart goals with a focus on carving out time for socializing, fitness, travel, reading, fun, new learning in the midst of work priorities.  And yes I’m building in all kinds of extraneous rewards and competitive aspects to motivate me.  And I feel revitalized with the prospect of moving forward.  Hope springs eternal!

Feeling Grateful

This December is my last as vice principal at Tecumseh Elementary School.  I have been at the school long enough to work, learn, play and share  experiences with enough children and adults to make leaving a hard thing to do.  Many Tecumseh students have heard my heartfelt speech that you choose everyday if you are going to make someone else’s life a little bit better or a little bit worse.  I just realized that I have missed an important element.  You have to understand that you impact others with the things you choose to do and the things you choose not to do.  During my time at Tecumseh, particularly this past December, the Tecumseh school community has chosen to show me that they care about me.  That choice has touched me deeply.

The cards, songs, poems, books and kind words show that you understand the things that are important to me and are grateful for our time together.  I love that I have been able to help someone learn to talk to people and make friends, make someone feel special by saying hi and smiling, make someone else feel like they can kick a soccer ball or code or blog or learn English or choose who they want to be.  I’m grateful to have talked and listened and laughed and learned with you.  I appreciate that many of you have learned that strength can be physical but also standing up for what is right and believing in yourself.

img_0354

Staff gave me a beautiful silver necklace with the wolf symbol crafted by Harold Alfred,  as my parting gift.  This symbol was also given to me on a card when I left Norquay Elementary School.  I love it.  As you well know, I am very interested in Indigenous ways of knowing and worked hard to further our collective understanding of our history and traditional indigenous teachings.  I take the selection of this wolf symbol as a huge compliment and inspiration.   The wolf represents great strength, is considered wise and powerful, chooses one mate for life and demonstrates strong loyalty to family.  Not a bad symbol to have chosen for you!

I’ve learned many things about strength of purpose at Tecumseh.  I love that staff signed me up for the Bike to Work Week and tested by ability to persevere until I could pedal up the hills from Kits to 41st and Commercial Street WITHOUT getting off my bike.  I love that so many in the school community invested in our We Welcome Refugees project to show the strength of our conviction that Canada is a welcoming country that demonstrates empathy and belief in what people have to benefit our country.  I love the enthusiasm that Tecumseh students bring to new learning and challenges.  I love that so many students have the strength to continue to try even when they fail or the task is really hard or maybe not even fair.   I also value that the families in our school community are so invested in creating a better future for their children, often in the face of significant challenges.  My Mom struggled raising two daughters and supporting her extended family as I was growing up.  I admire the same tenacity in our Tecumseh families.

Students, staff, parents and community partners have shown me in so many ways that they value the relationship we have developed over the years.  I cannot tell you how much it means to me that the relationships we have developed means as much to you, as they do to me.  I am so grateful for our time together and I wish all the very best for you in the future.

P.S.  I am also grateful to Harold Alfred for creating my very special and beautiful gift.  img_0355

Holiday Reading Extravaganza

The holiday season invites a celebration.  Just before holidays, Grade 3 – 7 students at Tecumseh headed to the gym for the 3rd Reading Extravaganza of the year.  Kids were excited and clutching books in their hands.  Some of the books were from classroom collections.  Some were from the library.  Some books were from home and being brought to trade for some new books to add to personal libraries at home.  The common element was that all of the kids were VERY excited about going to the gym to read for an hour.  It begs the question, what are the things that have allowed the act of reading to generate such excitement?  There is no real magic in creating readers.

  1.  Create opportunities for positive memories of reading.
  2. Teach the skills for children to decode and understand text.
  3. Provide access to engaging fiction and non-fiction text to pique interest.

Students come to school with a variety of experiences with text.  Fortunately sharing stories with children has become a regular part of primary classrooms and many intermediate classrooms.  It has become a way to get to know students  and stimulate curiosity, as well as to teach reading comprehension skills.  In many schools such as ours, we have programs such as One To One Readers, which allow children to develop emergent skills and relationships with volunteers who are there because they love books and the kids they are working with.  Reading becomes an enjoyable venture where you can learn about things or characters that you care about and share a laugh or two.

img_0283

Children are also encouraged to read throughout the school for a variety of purposes and in a variety of spaces.  The lawn chairs by the Christmas tree were much sought after this season as a place to read.  At the Reading Extravaganza, gymnastics and yoga mats were pulled out and all children carefully removed their shoes before getting cozy on the mats. Benches pulled into shapes, lawn chairs and blankets were equally captivating spaces to read.

img_0305

With 350 students reading in a gym, it may surprise you that students actually engaged in reading.  We did have some conversation about what reading behaviours look like.  There was some good discussion around the differences of what people want when they read.  The desire to share a good part or laugh out loud, means that the environment is not going to be silent.  However we also discussed how we could be respectful to those readers not wanting to be interrupted.

The trade a book opportunity happened first with students surrendering the books they wanted to trade for popsicle sticks and then trading in their popsicle books for new books. Some children brought books to give away too.  I was also giving away many of the bookmarks and freebies from conferences and much of my classroom collection due to my impending move to another school.  Students demonstrating the reading behaviours we discussed were given popsicle sticks by the adults in the room to go pick a book or other reading item.   Most of our students have learned to self select books that interest them, but the students shopping for selections helped each other with favorite picks.  In some cases, students were choosing books they wanted to give to siblings or cousins or friends for Christmas.img_0319

As a reader and an educator, my heart warms to see kids engaged and enjoying reading. Give them books and opportunities to read and they will come and have fun!

 

 

Teaching that “Feminist” is NOT a Bad Word

Madonna recently accepted an award as Woman of the Year at the Billboard Awards .  I don’t express myself in the same blatantly sexualized way as Madonna, but I do understand her quest to represent all aspects of what it is to be female.  Madonna was part of my empowerment as a young woman.  In elementary school, I loved Henry, Beezus and Ramona the Pest books, but the very specific gender roles irritated me, even as a little girl.  They just weren’t true in my life.  Trixie Belden Mysteries were the closest I could find to me.  Trixie did things, had adventures, got into trouble and was smart.  Madonna has consistently challenged things that she has identified as just not true in her experience.  She has expressed her perspective and been idolized or vilified for it.

My mother was my first feminist role model.  She invested her hopes and dreams for the future in a marriage to a man she was hopelessly in love with as an 18 year old.  Five years later, she packed up her infant daughter and her preschooler and left my father,  disillusioned with love but with the intact belief that she deserved to be treated with respect.  She struggled, worked hard, made lots of Mac N’Cheese and survived.  My sister and I grew up understanding the importance of being able to support ourselves, rely on our own intelligence and pull ourselves up when we fell.  Interestingly enough, my mother vehemently denied that she was a feminist.  She believed in bras, would not consider burning hers, religiously wore lipstick, had coiffed hair and had a well-developed sense of propriety.  Apparently these were irreconcilable with feminism in her mind.

I couldn’t wait until I was strong enough to push the mower.  My preference was to do chores outside rather than inside.  My self esteem grew with the things I could conquer like changing fuses, doing a 10 km run and eating alone in a restaurant.  Escaping the long blonde ringlets and emphasis on being what others wanted me to be, has been a lifelong endeavor.  I braved expressing my many opinions, although they often got me into trouble. Apparently strong opinions are still distasteful in a woman.  Women Who Run With The Wolves by Clarissa Pinkola Estes was an awe-inspiring revelation for me.  My red lipstick and an adherence to fashion were incomprehensible to my die-hard feminist friends but I had many circles of friends so I was free to be.   Scathing judgement and vindictiveness has come from women, but there are many other women who are kindred spirits and I have the good fortune to call friends.  Like my mother, I fell hopelessly in love when I was young but I defined a relationship very different from my parents.  I refused to promise to obey when I walked down the aisle and my husband knew that respect in the relationship was a non-negotiable.

My daughter grew up in the suburbs with a feminist mother.  In high school, I took her to a feminist art show at the Vancouver Art Gallery.  Her biggest revelation was there were other women who actually had the same ideas as me.  Apparently there were not many people in the suburbs defining themselves as feminists.  By her second year of university, she was beginning to become more reflective of her own experience of being a woman.  Her writing, her art and her adventures are focused very much on her personal journey of being a competitive, athletic, intelligent female with long blonde hair and big blue eyes.  Yet, there is a defiance of expectation and judgment and compliance to the status quo.  She avoids those who she feels judge her with annoyance but not hurt.  She invests her energy into reciprocal relationships.  She is learning through new experiences and reaches out to others with kindness.

There continues to be expectations of what women should or should not be or do or believe.  Madonna has challenged expectations for compliance and made it blatantly apparent that women are multi-dimensional human being with diverse opinions and ways of being.  She has articulated her opinions loudly in the face of disagreement.   Her call for women to support women is a worthy one, even those with opinions that run contrary to the rest of the group.  For our female students and daughters, I hope we can welcome them to live out loud, risk failure, explore new ideas and ways of being, and to look for something they like in the girl who walks in the door.  For our male students and sons, I hope we continue to teach empathy, to value strength in women, and the importance of treating the women in their lives with respect.  For all people who teach, I very much hope we are teaching that “feminist” is not a bad word but a logical step towards equality.

Discussing U.S. Election Results with Children

When my son was young, Bart Simpson hit the air waves.  I hated how the characters on the show talked and how they disrespected each other.  It incensed me to the point that I refused to let my son watch it, despite a considerable amount of begging.  The conversation ended briefly.  I soon discovered that he would go to his friend Dennis’ house to watch the show.  It wasn’t until that point that I agreed to watch the show with him.  It opened the conversation.   We would discuss what he found funny and what offended me.  Although he still preferred to watch it at Dennis’ house without my commentary, at least he understood my perspective about the importance of respectful interaction.

bart_simpson_200px

The election of Donald Trump to the position of President Elect of the United States has stopped many conversations.  Coming from a Canadian stance, it is largely incomprehensible how someone who has overtly disrespected and discredited woman, Latinos, Muslims, Immigrants and the LGBTQ community could be selected for public office, in part by the people he targeted.    I needed to step away from being personally offended by his hateful rhetoric, in order to come to the conclusion that this was not just a win for misogyny, racism, homophobia, xenophobia and a fixation on the gun culture.  This was a democratic election and the leader was chosen by the 55.6% of the population who opted to exercise their democratic right to vote.


It has pushed the need to ask questions about what is happening south of the border that has created the palpable anger and commanding voice for change?  What is a “protest vote”?  What is the “status quo” that has created such a reaction?  Who voted for Trump?  Did gender play a part in preventing the election of a woman?  How did the close alignment with bankers and sizeable payouts to prevent bank failure impact public opinion?  How much impact would Bernie Sanders have been able to make on what happened in a Clinton government?  What was the impact of the votes garnered by Jill Stein and Gary Johnson?   The list goes on.

As a vice principal in a school, I spend a large chunk of my time engaging in conversations about respectful interactions.  The rules of the game in school are intended to prepare them for life.

  • Tell the truth.
  • Tell the other person your thoughts in a respectful way.
  • Take responsibility for your behaviour.
  • Empathize with the other person you are in conflict with.
  • Don’t make yourself feel big by intimidating others with words, physical proximity or force.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau wrote a letter to third graders at Tecumseh thanking them for their work to welcome Syrian refugees to Canada earlier this year.  In the letter he told them that their voices and what they do matter right now.   I believe our children internalize these messages that their voices matter, just like they internalize the rules of respectful engagement when they live it.  My hope is that our children fully participate in the democratic process by voting and holding elected officials accountable for their conduct, actions and decisions.  My dream is for them to assume roles and responsibilities in the future where they are able to conduct themselves with integrity, intelligence and kindness to create a world based on respect for peace and justice.

.

Not Just 4Parents

Parenting is a tough gig.  There is no “perfect” set of directions to follow that work with every kid and every situation.  I started to teach before I had children and bemoaned that if only parents could be consistent with some basic rules in the household, all would be well. Having my own children brought a new level of humility to my perspective.  Sometimes we are able to follow our intuition and get it right.  Sometimes we’re just tired and want to avoid conflict.  Sometimes we are left in search of the magic answer to steer us in another direction that will solve all issues and reassure us that we’re doing the “right” thing.  There is no easy answer and parenting continues as one of THE most work intensive endeavours of my life.

My mother had her well-worn copy of Dr. Spock in her bedroom bookcase well into my teen years.  My parenting bible was How to Talk So Kids Will Listen and Listen So Kids Will Talk by Faber and Mazlish.  I read it repeatedly through the lucid moments, frustrations, phases and stages of bringing up my own two children.  For those parents bringing children up in the 21st Century, the “must read” is  The Dolphin Parent by Dr. Shimi K. Kang.  She is a Harvard-trained child and adult psychiatrist who provides advice in the form of prescriptions for parents who strive to raise children who have healthy relationships with the world and meet challenges with determination and hard work.

Dr. Kang provides a basic frame that divides parenting into three categories:

1. Authoritarian or the “I know best” parent.   Dr. Kang includes both the overdirecting and the overprotecting parents who micromanage their children’s lives.  This is an easy trap to fall into because many of us have been parented ourselves in this way.  She asserts that when parents micromanage their children’s lives, they are underparenting and thereby robbing children of a sense of control of their own lives.

The authoritarian parents include all of the types of parents with the familiar tags applied these days:

  •  “Tiger” parents ferocious in their dedication to pushing their children to achieve the competitive edge
  •  “Helicopter” parents waiting to swoop down to intercede on their child’s behalf
  • “Lawn mower or snowblower” who are always one step ahead of their child removing obstacles
  • “Bubble wrappers” – who see their role to protect children from even the slightest disappointment

She uses the metaphor of the butterfly to explain the problematic aspect of helping too much.  In his efforts to help, the little boy pulls off the cocoon that the butterfly is struggling to get free of.  To the little boy’s surprise, the butterfly doesn’t spread his wings and fly away.  The butterfly needed the time and struggle to develop the muscles and coordination to fly.

2.  Passive or “Jellyfish” parents  Dr. Kang frames these parents as those who avoid confrontation and underparent by failing to establish appropriate boundaries.  They fail to define socially appropriate expectations around respect, social etiquette or personal values.  These are parents who are overwhelmed with the demands of their own lives or strive to be best friends with their children.  They hand over control without providing guidance.  They struggle with saying “no” and will even resort to “turning a blind eye” or buying alcohol for their underage children to party with their friends.   Dr. Kant provides specific examples from her practice where these children end up irresponsible, impulsive, with poor relationships, a lack of respect for authority and an increased likelihood to engage in riskier behaviour.

3.  Authoritative parents establish clear rules and guidelines to support children in experiencing and coping with reasonable stress to develop the mental strength and resilience they need for independence.  This is where the metaphor of the dolphin comes in as a model of ideal for parenting.bottlenosedolphinmombabychinslapping-1

Dolphins are highly social animals and the bonding process is important.  Their young are provided with guidance and an opportunity to learn through play.  They experience natural consequences from mistakes through this playful exploration with the group.  Dr. Kang  is a big proponent of play to help students develop intelligence, emotional regulation, creativity and people skills.  Dr. Kang cites Albert Einstein’s quote “Play is the highest form of research” to emphasize the importance of play in a child’s life.  Overscheduling, memory drills, and repetitive practice puts the focus on demonstrating a specific skill set and kids don’t have the time to wonder.  They stop asking questions and will not risk an incorrect answer.  Apparently Edison failed 9,000 times before he eventually invented the lightbulb.  He had the benefit of experiencing the learning that comes from what is too often framed as “failure” rather than “learning”.   In the 21st Century, information is at our finger tips, but asking good questions is what generates innovation.

People have become very familiar with IQ or intelligent quotient as a standard measure of intelligence since the test was first widely applied to sort which soldiers would be sent to the front and which ones would be trained as officers in the U.S. Army prior to World War I.  However rote learning and regurgitation of information has not resulted in “smarter” students.  At the university level, The Faculty of Medicine, has needed to change requirements for entrance due to the fact that high achieving applicants do not demonstrate the problem solving ability or people skills to cope with the demands of a career in medicine.  We are learning that IQ is not the best measure of gauging how well a child will fair in life.

The 4 essential 21st Century Skills for success  have now been defined as CQ or Complete Quotient.  It has been determined by The Assessment and Teaching of 21st Century Skills, an organization at the University of Melbourne that includes more than 250 researchers from sixty different institutions worldwide.  These skills have been incorporated in educational institutions and workplace environments everywhere.  The higher the CQ of your child, the more adaptable, healthier, happier and more successful you child.  These skills include:

  • creativity
  • critical thinking
  • communication
  • collaboration

As an educator and as a parent, I have come into contact with many parents and many styles of parenting.  In most cases, all of these parents love their children intensely and have grand aspirations for their happiness and success in their futures.  This book is an excellent way for parents to take a step back and consider what they really want to accomplish with raising their children.   We still want to develop the intellectual skills of our children, but also the ability to problem solve, self regulate, form meaningful human relationships and the resilience to cope with failure and keep on learning.  It also gives us the permission to bond with our children through joyful play and shared interests.

The Science of Art

Dana Mulder, one of the Tecumseh staff members, gave us the opportunity to experience the Science of Art last week.  She has developed a considerable amount of background knowledge through her work providing programs at Van Dusen Gardens and provided an after school session for interested staff members on dyeing wool from natural materials.  My experience to date with dyeing anything has been Rit dyes out of a package.  It felt like a whole new world was introduced.

Dana not only taught us about the natural dyes used historically but also the stories and collection of the plants and insects that they were derived from.  The Brilliant History of Color in Art by Victoria Finlay, Wild Color  and Quilt History also provide a plethora of information for further exploration.  We learned there are three types of natural dyes derived from three different sources.  There are natural dyes obtained from plants (indigo), those obtained from animals (cochineal), and those obtained from minerals (ocher).

We used ALUM as the mordant to facilitate the chemical reaction that takes place between the dye and the fiber so that the dye is absorbed and brightens the colour slightly.  Other common mordants are: IRON (or copperas) which saddens or darken colors, bringing out green shades; TIN to brightens colors, especially reds, oranges and yellows; BLUE VITRIOL which saddens colors and brings out greens and TANNIC ACID used for tans and browns.  Some dyes like walnut hulls and lichens do not require mordants.

I chose the cochineal dye, not for the smell, but for the story and for the rich, red colour.  Historically cochineal was a valuable commodity, only beat out in trading popularity in Europe by silver and gold.  These dead insects, hence the smell, are ground with the mortar and pestle into a fine powder that is mixed with the alum for a beautiful colourfast dye.

As a child I spent a lot of time with my grandmothers.  Knitting, crochet and embroidery projects were clearly enjoyable but also had a specific utilitarian purpose.  Creating clothing, decorating pillow cases and saving money were a driving force.  I learned to appreciate these endeavors and continued to pursue them and teach them to students as hobbies.  Dana’s session provided us the opportunity to consider the cross curricular connections implicit in the craft. Her dyes included crushed marigolds, dandelions, leaves and the cochineal insect.  Dana also provided information on respectful harvesting, although I have grand aspirations of our students stripping the ground of all traces of dandelions in spring to deal with this pernicious weed on our school grounds and use them for something purposeful!

The new curriculum in British Columbia gives educators the opportunity to consider the things that we do in schools through a new lense.  Dyeing wool no longer belongs solely in the realm of arts and crafts.  It becomes part of science, the stories of history and Indigenous practices, as well as outdoor education.  It also provides a high level of engagement that was able to keep educators at school after a week of parent-teacher conferences and preparing for professional development sessions the following day.  It continues to hold our attention as we shake our jars daily to distribute the colour and imagine the final outcome.  Special thanks to Dana for opening our eyes.  My Nanny Keenan would be thrilled .  She had fond memories of this long-haired sheep on the farm in Brandon, Manitoba.  I can only imagine what she could have done with these dyes!